Chandra X-Ray Observatory

The workings of the Universe.
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Christopher K.
Posts: 4494
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Chandra X-Ray Observatory

Post by Christopher K. » June 5th, 2014, 2:30 pm

Chandra, NASA's "flagship mission for x-ray astronomy", left Earth from Cape Canaveral on 23 July 1999 with STS-93 (commanded by Colonel Eileen Collins). At 13.7 meters, Chandra is the largest satellite ever launched. The power needed to operate Chandra is the same as a hair dryer--two kilowatts.

Chandra's orbit is an ellipse and eighty-five percent of the time the spacecraft is above any charged particles that surround the Earth. At its closest to Earth, Chandra is only 16,000 kilometers away; at its farthest it is more than one-third of the distance to the Moon (in other words, 200 times higher than Hubble). One orbit is 64:18.

Chandra's main goal is to observe X-rays from high-energy regions, such as supernova remnants and black holes. Chandra can observe an x-ray up to one second before a black hole swallows it.

Tomorrow night at 7:30pm, Professor Rob Hynes will give a lecture entitled "The Universe Through X-Ray Glasses" at the Highland Road Park Observatory. The lecture has free admission and is for patrons fourteen and older. Professor Hynes uses data from Chandra to study black holes and neutron stars. After the lecture there will be sky viewing, weather permitting; the telescope operator will be BRAS president Merrill Hess.

About Chandra:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chand ... index.html

Christopher K.
Posts: 4494
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Chandra X-Ray Observatory

Post by Christopher K. » October 19th, 2014, 2:18 pm

Well, Chandra is spending part of this week studying Comet Siding Spring due to its close approach to Mars. There's nothing on Chandra's website yet, but the main news page is...
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chand ... index.html

Christopher K.
Posts: 4494
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Chandra X-Ray Observatory

Post by Christopher K. » June 5th, 2015, 1:50 pm

Professor Rob Hynes of LSU's physics and astronomy department will give a lecture on how he and other scientists use Chandra. This talk will be Friday 12 June, 7:30pm at the Highland Road Park Observatory.

The title is "The Universe Through X-Ray Glasses". The lecture free admission and is aimed at a general adult audience.

About Professor Hynes:
http://www.phys.lsu.edu/newwebsite/people/hynes.html

Christopher K.
Posts: 4494
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Chandra X-Ray Observatory

Post by Christopher K. » November 28th, 2017, 1:33 pm

Chandra has been used to accomplish the first X-ray detection of a gravitational wave!

Professor Rob Hynes of LSU's physics and astronomy department will give a lecture at HRPO on Friday 15 December at 7:30pm. The title is slight different--"The Universe with X-Ray Vision"--but will once again extol the joys of Chandra. The lecture free admission and is aimed at a general adult audience.

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