Dark stars: The seeds of supermassive black holes?

The workings of the Universe.
Post Reply
fred8615
Posts: 225
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 12:29 pm
Location: Sorrento, LA

Dark stars: The seeds of supermassive black holes?

Post by fred8615 » July 22nd, 2019, 3:34 pm

Powered by dark matter, dark stars are hypothetical objects that may have inhabited the early universe. If they existed, these mysterious beasts would not only have been the first stars to form in the cosmos, they also might explain how supermassive black holes got their start.

Fueled by dark matter

Normal stars all power themselves in the same way: nuclear fusion. Stars are so massive that they’re constantly on the verge of collapsing in on themselves. But as gravity squeezes a star, it generates so much heat in the star's core that it smooshes the atoms together, releasing energy. This energy provides just enough outward pressure to precisely counterbalance a star's gravitational collapse.

But for dark stars, the story's a little different.

Theories suggest that dark stars would be mostly made from the same material as normal stars — namely, hydrogen and helium. But because these hypothetical dark stars would have formed in the early universe, when the cosmos was a lot denser, they also likely contain a small but significant amount of dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) — a leading dark matter candidate.

These WIMPs are thought to serve as their own antimatter particles, they can annihilate with one another, producing pure energy. Within a dark star, these extremely powerful WIMP annihilations could offer enough outward pressure to prevent the star's collapse without the need for core fusion.

Read more: http://www.astronomy.com/news/2019/07/d ... lack-holes
Frederick J. Barnett
"Someone's got to take the responsibility if the job's going to get done!! Do you think that's easy?!" Gregory Peck - The Guns Of Navarone

Post Reply