M82

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Christopher K.
Posts: 5244
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

M82

Post by Christopher K. »

For those who dare, M82 will take the spotlight during the Thursday (29 April) broadcast of Coast to Coast AM.

M82 is indeed an unusual object. It forms a gravitationally-bound pair with the better-known M81 in Ursa Major; both were discovered by J.E. Bode in December 1774. Admiral Smyth described M82 as "very long, narrow, bright, especially in northern limb, but paler than M81".

The galaxy was intensely studied in 1962 by A. Sandage and C.R. Lynds and identified as a strong radio source. It is also a major source of infrared radiation; activity at these wavelengths are indicative of galaxy-wide star formation, and thus M82 is known as a "starburst galaxy".

Coast to Coast AM site:
http://www.coasttocoastam.com/

M82 webpage from Students for the Exploration and Development of Space:
http://seds.lpl.arizona.edu/messier/m/m082.html

Caltech's "Cool Cosmos" site has a multiwavelength gallery for M82:
http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/cosm ... m/m82.html

M82 Hubble mosiac highlighting a specific wavelength of red light emitted by ionized hydrogen:
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archiv ... s/2006/14/

Johannes Schedler's awesome M81/M82 image from March 2006:
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap060415.html

Excellent historical background on M82 can be garnered from pp. 1987-1983 of the irreplaceable Burnham's Celestial Handbook.

Christopher K.
Posts: 5244
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: M82

Post by Christopher K. »

M82 made it onto the list of Bob Berman's fifty strangest objects. It's #47 in his collection. Not too surprising, considering in the infrared M82 is the brightest galaxy in this area. Because it also emit huge amounts of radio waves, its alternate label is Ursa Major A. In M82's core stars are born at ten times the rate of those in the Milky Way.

More information:
50 Weirdest Objects in the Cosmos, pp. 12-13.

Christopher K.
Posts: 5244
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: M82

Post by Christopher K. »

M82 (as imaged by Ken Crawford) was the APOD for Independence Day. Well, the picture does have red, white and tints of blue.

Below are the times during which M82 reaches its highest altitude of fifty-one degrees in the Baton Rouge sky...
9 January = 3:46am CDT
13 January = 3:30am CDT
17 January = 3:15am CDT
21 January = 2:59am CDT
25 January = 2:43am CDT
29 January = 2:27am CDT
2 February = 2:12am CDT
6 February = 1:56am CDT
10 February = 1:40am CDT
14 February = 1:24am CDT
18 February = 1:09am CDT
22 February = 12:53am CDT
26 February = 12:37am CDT
2 March = 12:22am CDT
6 March = 12:06am CDT
10 March = 10:46pm CST
14 March = 10:31pm CST
18 March = 10:15pm CST
22 March = 9:59pm CST
26 March = 9:43pm CST
30 March = 9:28pm CST
3 April = 9:12pm CST
7 April = 8:56pm CST
11 April = 8:40pm CST
15 April = 8:25pm CST
19 April = 8:09pm CST

M82 is circumpolar from Baton Rouge.

4 July APOD:
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap130704.html

Christopher K.
Posts: 5244
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: M82

Post by Christopher K. »

The Moon is close to new, and so the next few nights are prime for finding galaxies like M82. It will be highest this week around 10:45pm CDT.

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