Caldwell 2

Pretty patterns of gas and dust.
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Christopher K.
Posts: 5481
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Caldwell 2

Post by Christopher K. »

Caldwell 2 (also called NGC 40) is a planetary nebula a little over a half-degree in angular size. The nebula itself is magnitude 11, and its brightest star is magnitude 12. It may be much easier to view the star than the nebula!

Here are the times during which Caldwell 2 reaches a culmination of forty-eight degrees in the Baton Rouge sky.
5 August = 4:22am
9 August = 4:06am
13 August = 3:50am
17 August = 3:35am
21 August = 3:19am
25 August = 3:03am
29 August = 2:47am
2 September = 2:32am
6 September = 2:16am
10 September = 2:00am
14 September = 1:44am
18 September = 1:29am
22 September = 1:13am
26 September = 12:57am
30 September = 12:42am
4 October = 12:26am
8 October = 12:10am
12 October = 11:50pm
16 October = 11:35pm
20 October = 11:19pm
24 October = 11:03pm
28 October = 10:47pm
1 November = 10:32pm
Times above are Daylight. Times below are Standard.
5 November = 9:16pm
9 November = 9:00pm
13 November = 8:45pm
17 November = 8:29pm
21 November = 8:13pm
25 November = 7:57pm
29 November = 7:42pm
3 December = 7:26pm
7 December = 7:10pm

An image:
http://www.hawastsoc.org/deepsky/images/cep/ngc40.jpg

Christopher K.
Posts: 5481
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Caldwell 2

Post by Christopher K. »

Some dim magnitudes of galaxies, clusters and nebulae are best left to the camera equipment...
https://www.luther.edu/astronomy/galler ... lae/ngc40/

The Caldwell Catalog was created by the late Patrick Moore...
https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-n ... -19232012/
Unlike the Messier Catalog, the Caldwell is arranged by right ascension so viewers can hunt the objects in their numerical order throughout the year.

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