Dawn Mission

Small pieces of rock, with a big influence (just ask the dinosaurs).
Christopher K.
Posts: 5482
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Dawn Mission

Post by Christopher K. »

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute in Germany have studied Dawn's images of Vesta are discovered previously unrevealed geological structures. These structures include craters buried by quakes and material brought by space rocks.

More information:
http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/dawn/asteroid-20131216/

Christopher K.
Posts: 5482
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Dawn Mission

Post by Christopher K. »

The mantle of Vesta is lacking the proportion of olivine expected by scientists. This from a 6 November 2013 Nature study. Olivine is a group of minerals harder than glass. It usually doesn't form crystals but when it does the crystals are translucent to transparent and olive-green in color. It occurs in a wide variety of volcanic rock on Earth.

More about olivine:
http://www.esci.umn.edu/courses/1001/mi ... vine.shtml
http://www.science.smith.edu/geoscience ... ivine.html

Christopher K.
Posts: 5482
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Dawn Mission

Post by Christopher K. »

Dawn had a small hitch last month, but now it has regular ion thrusting. The thrusting stopped for some reason on 11 September, right before scientists were to use the Deep Space Network to communicate with it. Engineers determined the cause was probably a high-energy particle of radiation. Standard thrusting resumed on 15 September. Due to this and another problem related to main antenna's ability to point, Dawn will enter into orbit around Ceres in April, one month later than planned.

Christopher K.
Posts: 5482
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Dawn Mission

Post by Christopher K. »

Some scientists now speculate that the lack of olivine at the depths of two craters located at Vesta's south pole may be due to an unexpectedly thick crust. Vesta is 530 kilometers wide. The study was in the 17 July Nature.

Christopher K.
Posts: 5482
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Dawn Mission

Post by Christopher K. »

Dawn is scheduled to reach Ceres in early March. When it reaches that huge target it will become the first spacecraft to orbit two previously-unexplored worlds.

More information:
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sc ... 0dec_dawn/

Christopher K.
Posts: 5482
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Dawn Mission

Post by Christopher K. »

Tonight at 7:30pm the Highland Road Park Observatory will present "The Dawn Mission", in anticipation of the arrival of the Dawn spacecraft to Ceres. The talk has free admission and is aimed toward a general adult audience.

Christopher K.
Posts: 5482
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Dawn Mission

Post by Christopher K. »

At the tenth anniversary of its leaving home, HRPO will cover the major discoveries by—and the future of—this ongoing mission. "Dawn at Ceres and Vesta" will be presented on Friday 22 September at 7:30pm. The talk has free admission and is aimed toward a general adult audience.

Christopher K.
Posts: 5482
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Dawn Mission

Post by Christopher K. »

Today at 1pm CDT, NASA-TV will broadcast "Dawn: Mission to Small Worlds". NASA will replay the program at 5pm, 7pm and 9pm. The Dawn mission is nearing its end.

The participants scheduled are...
*Jim Green, NASA chief scientist
*Carol Raymond, Dawn principal investigator at JPL
*Marc Rayman, Dawn mission director and chief engineer at JPL

More information:
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa ... eroid-belt

fred8615
Posts: 282
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 12:29 pm
Location: Sorrento, LA

Re: Dawn Mission

Post by fred8615 »

The Dawn Mission has officially ended. :(

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft has gone silent, ending a historic mission that studied time capsules from the solar system’s earliest chapter.

Dawn missed scheduled communications sessions with NASA's Deep Space Network on Wednesday, Oct. 31, and Thursday, Nov. 1. After the flight team eliminated other possible causes for the missed communications, mission managers concluded that the spacecraft finally ran out of hydrazine, the fuel that enables the spacecraft to control its pointing. Dawn can no longer keep its antennas trained on Earth to communicate with mission control or turn its solar panels to the Sun to recharge.

Read more: https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa ... mes-to-end
Frederick J. Barnett
"Someone's got to take the responsibility if the job's going to get done!! Do you think that's easy?!" Gregory Peck - The Guns Of Navarone

Post Reply