DSCOVR

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Christopher K.
Posts: 4333
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

DSCOVR

Post by Christopher K. » February 10th, 2015, 5:12 pm

The Deep Space Climate Observatory will orbit between the Earth and the Sun at Lagrange Point 1. DSCOVR will measure magnetic field intensity and the distribution of ions and electrons in the solar wind; it will also measure visible and infrared light reflected from Earth. This spacecraft was, surprisingly, in storage for about a decade. Yet other than getting its batteries replaced, it will fly with the same technology.

The countdown for its launch is in progress. It is expected to leave Earth on a Falcon 9 at about 5:06pm CST. The launch can be viewed on NASA-TV, on NASA's website or at the Highland Road Park Observatory.

More information:
http://www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR/mission.html
https://blogs.nasa.gov/dscovr/

Tom
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Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:40 pm
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Re: DSCOVR

Post by Tom » February 10th, 2015, 8:50 pm

As it turns out, today's launch of the Falcon 9 with the DSCOVR Spacecraft, was scrubbed due to upper level high winds. SpaceX will make another go at it tomorrow at 6:03 pm EST. Weather is expected to be much better for tomorrow's launch.
http://www.space.com/28519-spacex-rocke ... delay.html

Tom
Posts: 95
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:40 pm
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Re: DSCOVR

Post by Tom » February 11th, 2015, 6:47 pm

SpaceX launched it's Falcon 9 rocket at 6:03 pm EDT this afternoon. Due to poor weather conditions the landing attempt of the booster was not attempted.
http://www.space.com/28481-spacex-launc ... llite.html

Christopher K.
Posts: 4333
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: DSCOVR

Post by Christopher K. » September 2nd, 2015, 7:14 pm

DSCOVR's EPIC camera captured the 16 July New Moon at an interesting angle--from behind! The viewer therefore sees a completely-lit farside. In the background, Hurricane Dolores can be seen on Earth.

7 August APOD:
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap150807.html

Christopher K.
Posts: 4333
Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: DSCOVR

Post by Christopher K. » August 20th, 2016, 3:44 pm

On 27 July the Space Weather Prediction Center began using data from DSCOVR; this data will take the place of some of that obtained from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). DSCOVR reached its science-gathering orbit on 8 June of last year; it's 1,610,000 million kilometers closer to the Sun than Earth. At this location the spacecraft can warn of incoming eruptions from the Sun.

The Faraday Cup plasma sensor will be measuring velocity and temperature of the solar wind. A magnetometer will measure the strength and direction of the Sun's magnetic field.

More information:
http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/news/27-july-2 ... -satellite

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