Is String Theory really a Theory of Everything?

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Is String Theory really a Theory of Everything?

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fred8615
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Joined: October 12th, 2009, 12:29 pm
Location: Sorrento, LA

Is String Theory really a Theory of Everything?

Post by fred8615 » August 1st, 2012, 12:05 pm

Since PBS recently reran the NOVA miniseries, "The Elegant Universe," which explains the history of and the basics of String Theory, I thought I'd rerun the poll question from the old forum.

ST is based on the idea that really tiny sub-atomic strings of energy make up the entire universe. Matter, energy, even gravity is composed of these vibrating strings. Using the mathematics of ST, physicists have even been able to unify gravity, electro-magnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces, as well as General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. The potential is that this may lead to the long sought Theory of Everything. ST could even explain the Big Bang.

But ST does have problems. Because the strings are so small, they likely will never be observed directly, nor does it make many predictions that can be tested for, at least not at this time. And in order to work, it requires eleven dimensions instead of the known four. Although the math seems to work, because there is no observable effects of ST, many physicists don't want to jump on the bandwagon just yet.

What do you think?

If you would like to learn more about String Theory, "The Elegant Universe" is viewable online at this link.
Frederick J. Barnett
"Someone's got to take the responsibility if the job's going to get done!! Do you think that's easy?!" Gregory Peck - The Guns Of Navarone

Christopher K.
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Re: Is String Theory really a Theory of Everything?

Post by Christopher K. » February 12th, 2013, 10:22 pm

String Theory can, I suppose, explain a lot. However, so did Bode's Law and using epicycles to explain planetary motion--to a point. Though the theory is elegant and fun to read about, I understand the caution.

Poppa-Chris
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Re: Is String Theory really a Theory of Everything?

Post by Poppa-Chris » February 13th, 2013, 5:38 pm

It's the requirement for 11 dimensions that gives me pause.
It seems counter intuitive to me somehow. It definitely violate the KISS principle. (Keep It Simple, Stupid!)
Poppa-Chris


"First star to the right, then straight on until morning!" - Peter Pan

Christopher K.
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Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
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Re: Is String Theory really a Theory of Everything?

Post by Christopher K. » August 2nd, 2014, 4:48 pm

String theory is listed as one of the 100 Discoveries that Changed the World by a National Geographic staff. The publication states that although difficult to prove, string theory may get a plus in its column within the next decade if evidence is found for the existence of high-energy supersymmetry (which string theory predicts).

The idea is that the components of an atom are not zero-dimensional objects but vibrating one-dimensional strings. In the 1990s the major varieties of string theory were unified into M-theory, which asserts that all "strings" are one-dimensional slices of two-dimensional membranes vibrating in, as Chris D. reminds us, eleven-dimensional space.

Christopher K.
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Joined: October 12th, 2009, 3:28 pm
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Re: Is String Theory really a Theory of Everything?

Post by Christopher K. » September 14th, 2018, 5:58 pm

Tomorrow at 10:15am CDT, Dr. Kristina Launey will deliver a lecture called "Modeling Nuclei with Supercomputers". This will be at Nicholson 130 and the flyer implies it is for an adult audience. She will discuss how investigators are using computer models in an attempt to unlock the secrets of the strong nuclear force.

More information:
https://www.lsu.edu/physics/colloquia-s ... 2018-1.pdf

About Kristina Launey:
https://www.lsu.edu/physics/people/faculty/launey.php

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